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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/12407
Title: Clinical and economic burden of community-acquired pneumonia amongst adults in the Asia-Pacific region
Authors: Jae Hoon Song
Visanu Thamlikitkul
Po Ren Hsueh
Sungkyunkwan University
Mahidol University
National Taiwan University Hospital
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Aug-2011
Citation: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents. Vol.38, No.2 (2011), 108-117
Abstract: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity amongst adults in the Asia-Pacific region. Literature published between 1990 and May 2010 on the clinical and economic burden of CAP amongst adults in this region was reviewed. CAP is a significant health burden with significant economic impact in this region. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and advanced age were risk factors for CAP. Aetiological agents included Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Gram-negative bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Staphylococcus aureus and atypical pathogens (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella spp.), with important differences in the prevalence of these pathogens within the region. Antibiotic resistance was significant but was not linked to excess mortality. Aetiological pathogens remained susceptible to newer antimicrobial agents. Rational antibiotic use is essential for preventing resistance, and increased surveillance is required to identify future trends in incidence and aetiology and to drive treatment and prevention strategies. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=79959688909&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/12407
ISSN: 18727913
09248579
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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