Simple jQuery Dropdowns
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/12440
Title: Congenital vertical talus in multiple pterygium syndrome
Authors: Chanika Angsanuntsukh
Murat Oto
Laurens Holmes
Kenneth J. Rogers
Marilyn Marnie King
Maureen Donohoe
S. Jay Kumar
Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children
Mahidol University
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2011
Citation: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. Vol.31, No.5 (2011), 564-569
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Congenital vertical talus (CVT) is a rare foot deformity, but it is a commonly associated anomaly in patients with multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS). If left untreated, it can cause pain and morbidity, which will affect the patient's ambulation and quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of CVT among patients with MPS, to characterize the clinical and radiological features and examine the outcome of treatment. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records from 1969 to 2009, and detected 14 patients with a diagnosis of MPS. Data regarding clinical findings, radiographs, associated anomalies, and treatment were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: CVT was seen in 10 of 14 patients (71%). All of them had bilateral involvement. Eight of the 10 (80%) were girls, and 3 of these 10 (30%) were nonambulatory patients. All 7 ambulatory patients had manipulation and casting, followed by a single-stage surgical release. The mean age at surgery was 3.0±3.7 years (range, 3 mo-9 y 2 mo). At the last follow-up, all of the 7 patients (100%) had painless plantigrade feet and a reduced talonavicular joint, and none had recurrence of the deformity. The overall mean follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-19 y) and the mean age at the last follow-up was 9 years (range, 2-23 y). The commonly associated anomalies were scoliosis (93%), tethered cord (14%), hip dislocation (43%), cardiac (29%), respiratory (43%), and gastrointestinal anomalies (29%). CONCLUSIONS: CVT is common in MPS. The other common anomalies included scoliosis, hip dislocation, and respiratory problems. Treatment with manipulation and casting followed by, a single-stage surgical release resulted in a good outcome. © 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=79958829207&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/12440
ISSN: 15392570
02716798
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.