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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/14304
Title: The anaemia of Plasmodium vivax malaria
Authors: Nicholas M. Douglas
Nicholas M. Anstey
Pierre A. Buffet
Jeanne R. Poespoprodjo
Tsin W. Yeo
Nicholas J. White
Ric N. Price
Menzies School of Health Research
Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
Royal Darwin Hospital
Universite Pierre et Marie Curie
Hopital Pitie Salpetriere
Institut Pasteur, Paris
Mimika District Health Authority
Papuan Health and Community Development Foundation
Mahidol University
Keywords: Immunology and Microbiology;Medicine
Issue Date: 19-Jun-2012
Citation: Malaria Journal. Vol.11, (2012)
Abstract: Plasmodium vivax threatens nearly half the worlds population and is a significant impediment to achievement of the millennium development goals. It is an important, but incompletely understood, cause of anaemia. This review synthesizes current evidence on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment and consequences of vivax-associated anaemia. Young children are at high risk of clinically significant and potentially severe vivax-associated anaemia, particularly in countries where transmission is intense and relapses are frequent. Despite reaching lower densities than Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax causes similar absolute reduction in red blood cell mass because it results in proportionately greater removal of uninfected red blood cells. Severe vivax anaemia is associated with substantial indirect mortality and morbidity through impaired resilience to co-morbidities, obstetric complications and requirement for blood transfusion. Anaemia can be averted by early and effective anti-malarial treatment. © 2012 Douglas et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84862234371&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/14304
ISSN: 14752875
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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