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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/14359
Title: Cryopreserved Plasmodium vivax and cord blood reticulocytes can be used for invasion and short term culture
Authors: Céline Borlon
Bruce Russell
Kanlaya Sriprawat
Rossarin Suwanarusk
Annette Erhart
Laurent Renia
François Nosten
Umberto D'Alessandro
Prins Leopold Instituut voor Tropische Geneeskunde
Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore
Shoklo Malaria Research Unit
Mahidol University
Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Keywords: Immunology and Microbiology;Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Feb-2012
Citation: International Journal for Parasitology. Vol.42, No.2 (2012), 155-160
Abstract: The establishment of a Plasmodium vivax in vitro culture system is critical for the development of new vaccine, drugs and diagnostic tests. Although short-term cultures have been successfully set up, their reproducibility in laboratories without direct access to P. vivax-infected patients has been limited by the need for fresh parasite isolates. We explored the possibility of using parasite isolates and reticulocytes, both cryopreserved, to perform invasion and initiate short-term culture. Invasion results obtained with both cryopreserved isolates and reticulocytes were similar to those obtained with fresh samples. This method should be easily replicated in laboratories outside endemic areas and will substantially contribute to the development of a continuous P. vivax culture. In addition, this model could be used for testing vaccine candidates as well as for studying invasion-specific molecular mechanisms. © 2012 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84856506075&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/14359
ISSN: 18790135
00207519
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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