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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/18696
Title: Scanning electron microscopic study of human neuroblastoma cells affected with Naegleria fowleri Thai strains
Authors: Supathra Tiewcharoen
Jundee Rabablert
Pruksawan Chetanachan
Virach Junnu
Dusit Worawirounwong
Nat Malainual
Mahidol University
Silpakorn University
National Institutes of Health, Bethesda
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences;Immunology and Microbiology;Medicine;Veterinary
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2008
Citation: Parasitology Research. Vol.103, No.5 (2008), 1119-1123
Abstract: In order to understand the pathogenesis of Naegleria fowleri in primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, the human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) and African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells were studied in vitro. Amoeba suspension in cell-culture medium was added to the confluent monolayer of SK-N-MC and Vero cells. The cytopathic activity of N. fowleri trophozoites in co-culture system was elucidated by scanning electron microscope at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h. Two strains of N. fowleri displayed well-organized vigorous pseudopods in Nelson's medium at 37°C. In co-culture, the target monolayer cells were damaged by two mechanisms, phagocytosis by vigorous pseudopods and engulfment by sucker-like apparatus. N. fowleri trophozoites produced amoebostomes only in co-culture with SK-N-MC cells. In contrast, we could not find such apparatus in the co-culture with Vero cells. The complete destruction time (100%) at 1:1 amoeba/cells ratio of SK-N-MC cells (1 day) was shorter than the Vero cells (12 days). In conclusion, SK-N-MC cells were confirmed to be a target model for studying neuropathogenesis of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=51449124288&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/18696
ISSN: 09320113
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2006-2010

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