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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/20289
Title: A cross-sectional study of intestinal parasitic infections among schoolchildren in Nan Province, northern Thailand
Authors: J. Waikagul
S. Krudsood
P. Radomyos
B. Radomyos
K. Chalemrut
P. Jonsuksuntigul
S. Kojima
S. Looareesuwan
W. Thaineau
Mahidol University
Thailand Ministry of Public Health
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2002
Citation: Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. Vol.33, No.2 (2002), 218-223
Abstract: A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections at eight schools in Bo Klau district and four schools in Chalerm Prakiet district, Nan Province, in January and February, 2001. A total of 1,010 fecal samples were examined using the formalin-ether sedimentation technique. Results revealed that the rate of helminthic infection was 60.0%, while protozoa accounted for 36.2% of infections; mixed infections were common, resulting in a total prevalence of both parasites of 68.1%. Helminthic parasites, listed by frequency of infections, were Ascaris lumbricoides (21.7%), hookworm (18.5%), Trichuris trichiura (16.3%), Opisthorchis viverrini (1.7%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.9%) and Enterobius vermicularis (0.9%). The protozoal infections were Entamoeba coli (25.8%), Giardia lamblia (5.3%), Endolimax nana (2.5%), Entamoeba histolytica (1.4%), Blastocystis hominis (0.8%), Chilomastix mesnili (0.3%) and lodamoeba b├╝tschlii (0.1%). This study emphasizes the need for improved environmental hygiene ie clean water supplies and enhanced sanitation, in affected communities. Health promotion, by means of a school-based educational approach is recommended; regular check-ups should be implemented, and a continuos program of treatment should be considered.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=0036598885&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/20289
ISSN: 01251562
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2001-2005

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