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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/20874
Title: Transmission-blocking activity of tafenoquine (WR-238605) and artelinic acid against naturally circulating strains of plasmodium vivax in Thailand
Authors: Narong Ponsa
Jetsumon Sattabongkot
Pattamaporn Kittayapong
Nantana Eikarat
Russell E. Coleman
Mahidol University
Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Thailand
Keywords: Immunology and Microbiology
Issue Date: 1-Nov-2003
Citation: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Vol.69, No.5 (2003), 542-547
Abstract: The sporontocidal activity of tafenoquine (WR-238605) and artelinic acid was determined against naturally circulating isolates of Plasmodium vivax in western Thailand. Primaquine was used as a negative control and a dihydroacridine-dione (WR-250547) was used as a positive control. Laboratory-reared Anopheles dirus mosquitoes were infected with P. vivax by allowing mosquitoes to feed on blood (placed in an artificial-membrane feeding apparatus) collected from gametocytemic volunteers reporting to local malaria clinics in Tak province, Thailand. Four days postinfection, mosquitoes were refed on uninfected mice treated 90 minutes earlier with a given drug. Drug activity was determined by assessing oocyst and sporozoite development. Neither primaquine nor artelinic acid affected oocyst or sporozoite development at a dose of 100 mg of base drug/kg of mouse body weight. In contrast, tafenoquine and WR-250547 affected sporogonic development at doses as low as 25.0 and 0.39 mg/kg, respectively. The potential role of these compounds in the prevention of malaria transmission is discussed, as are alternative strategies for the use of transmission-blocking antimalarial drugs.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=1342304320&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/20874
ISSN: 00029637
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2001-2005

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