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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/21187
Title: Catch-up vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae type b in human immunodeficiency virus-infected Thai children older than 2 years old
Authors: Kulkanya Chokephaibulkit
Wanatpreeya Phongsamart
Nirun Vanprapar
Tawee Chotpitayasunondh
Sanay Chearskul
Mahidol University
Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health
Keywords: Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology;Immunology and Microbiology;Medicine;Veterinary
Issue Date: 7-May-2004
Citation: Vaccine. Vol.22, No.15-16 (2004), 2018-2022
Abstract: Although most of Thai children older than 2 years are immune against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) without prior vaccination, it may not be the case in HIV-infected children. Of 44 HIV-infected children tested before vaccination at the mean age of 36 months (range 24-84 months), 32 (73%) were susceptible (anti-PRP <0.15 μg/ml). At 6 months after a single dose of tetanus-conjugated Hib vaccination, 67% developed anti-PRP ≥0.15 μg/ml, however, only 33% developed titer of ≥1 μg/ml. Four of seven (57%) with anti-PRP 0.15-0.99 μg/ml at baseline were boosted to the titer of ≥1 μg/ml after vaccination. Seroconversion rate and geometric mean titer (GMT) level in response to the vaccination did not correlate with HIV stage, but did correlate with viral load level of 100,000 copies/ml. HIV-infected children older than 2 years would benefit from Hib vaccination, although, one dose catch-up schedule is not sufficient in a third of these children. A second dose is needed in these children especially those with viral load of level of >100,000 copies/ml. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=2342644906&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/21187
ISSN: 0264410X
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2001-2005

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