Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/22795
Title: Suppression of erythroid progenitor cells during malarial infection in Thai adults caused by serum inhibitor
Authors: S. JOOTAR
W. CHAISIRIPOOMKERE
P. PHOLVICHA
A. LEELASIRI
W. PRAYOONWIWAT
W. MONGKONSVITRAGOON
T. SRICHAIKUL
Mahidol University
Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
Pramongkutklao Hospital
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Jan-1993
Citation: Clinical & Laboratory Haematology. Vol.15, No.2 (1993), 87-92
Abstract: Summary The bone marrows of 21 Thai adults infected with Plasmodium falciparum malaria were cultured for CFU‐E and BFU‐E by using AB serum, autologous serum (parasitaemia) and autologous serum (post‐parasitaemia). Six patients had no complication and 15 patients had pulmonary, renal or haematologic complications. In the non‐complicated cases, sera during parasitaemia did not suppress the post‐parasitaema CFU‐E and BFU‐E. Post parasitaemia, there was suppression of CFU‐E by parasitaemia sera. In the complicated cases, the autologous sera during parasitaemia suppressed the growth of both CFU‐E and BFU‐E both during and after parasitaemia (P <0.05). The post‐parasitaemia sera had neither a suppressive nor a stimulating effect. In the complicated cases, the progenitor cells cultured from the bone marrow post‐parasitaemia were fewer in number than those cultured from the bone marrow during parasitaemia using the same sera. Two possible mechanisms of suppression are postulated, namely the reduction of erythropoietin or the increased tumour necrosis factor during malarial infection. Further studies to clarify this are being carried out. Copyright © 1993, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=0027221569&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/22795
ISSN: 13652257
01419854
Appears in Collections:Scopus 1991-2000

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