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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/24745
Title: Pediatric anesthesia adverse events: The Thai Anesthesia Incidents Study (THAI Study) database of 25,098 cases
Authors: Nutchanart Bunchungmongkol
Wanna Somboonviboon
Suwannee Suraseranivongse
Mayuree Vasinanukorn
Waraporn Chau-in
Thanoo Hintong
Chiang Mai University
Chulalongkorn University
Mahidol University
Prince of Songkla University
Khon Kaen University
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2007
Citation: Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand. Vol.90, No.10 (2007), 2072-2079
Abstract: Background: The Thai Anesthesia Incidents Study (THAI Study) is the first national study of anesthesia outcomes during anesthesia practice in Thailand. The authors extracted data of 25,098 pediatric cases from THAI Study. Objective: To report patient, surgical, and anesthetic profiles in order to determine the incidences of adverse events and their related factors. Material and Method: A multi-centered prospective descriptive study was conducted among 20 hospitals across Thailand over a year from March 1, 2003 to February 28, 2004. Data in children aged 15 years and younger describing practices and adverse events were collected during anesthesia, in the recovery room and 24 hours postoperative period. Results: Infants (0-1 year) had a significantly higher rate of adverse events compared with adults (4.6% versus 1.2%). Desaturation was the most common adverse event. The adverse events happened mostly during anesthesia (67%). Infants had significantly higher incidences of delayed detection of esophageal intubation, desaturation, reintubation, cardiac arrest, death, and drug error than older children and adults. Incidences of desaturation, reintubation, difficult intubation, coma/convulsion, cardiac arrest, and death were significantly higher in children with ASA physical status 3-5 than those with ASA physical status 1-2. Conclusion: Infants are prone to higher adverse events compared with older children and adults. Main adverse events were respiratory-related and they occurred mostly during anesthesia.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=35848936527&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/24745
ISSN: 01252208
01252208
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2006-2010

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