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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/25418
Title: Clinical and prognostic categorization of extraintestinal nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in infants and children
Authors: Sayomporn Sirinavin
Panida Jayanetra
Ammarin Thakkinstian
Mahidol University
Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
Keywords: Immunology and Microbiology
Issue Date: 1-Dec-1999
Citation: Clinical Infectious Diseases. Vol.29, No.5 (1999), 1151-1156
Abstract: The study included 172 patients, aged 0-15 years, for whom at least 1 nonfecal, nonurinary specimen was culture-positive for nontyphoidal Salmonella. Ninety-five percent had positive blood cultures. Immunocompromising diseases were found in 19% of 74 infants and 77% of 98 children. Associations between the study factors and outcomes, as localized infection or death, were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Thirty- three patients had localized infections. An adjusted risk factor for development of localized infections was an age of <12 months (P = .003). There were 17 deaths. The case-fatality rates were 43% and 10% for immunocompromised and 5% and 0% for nonimmunocompromised infants and children, respectively. Adjusted risk factors for death were age of <12 months (P = .006), inappropriate antimicrobial therapy (P = .014), meningitis or culture-proven pneumonia due to nontyphoidal Salmonella (P = .004), and immunocompromised status (P < .001). The clinical courses and prognoses for infants and children with extraintestinal infection due to nontyphoidal Salmonella can be categorized into 4 groups according to the characteristics of age (infants vs. children) and host status (immunocompromised vs. nonimmunocompromised).
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=0033497909&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/25418
ISSN: 10584838
Appears in Collections:Scopus 1991-2000

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