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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/28031
Title: Blood stage plasmodium falciparum antigens induce immunoglobulin class switching in human enriched b cell culture
Authors: Pachuen Potup
Ratchanok Kumsiri
Shigeyuki Kano
Thareerat Kalambaheti
Sornchai Looareesuwan
Troye Blomberg Marita
Yaowapa Maneerat
Department of Tropical Radioisotopes
Mahidol University
Naresuan University
National Center for Global Health and Medicine
Stockholms universitet
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2009
Citation: Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. Vol.40, No.4 (2009), 651-664
Abstract: This study aimed to demonstrate class switch recombination (CSR) in heavy chain expressing immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgE in human B cells after exposure to Plasmodium falciparum schizont lysate. Human B cells (CD20 +CD27 -) were cultured with crude P. falciparum antigen (cPfAg) and anti-CD40. On Day 4 post-exposure, total RNA from B cells was prepared and the occurrence of CSR from IgM to IgG and/or IgE was investigated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Molecular markers to detect active CSR included enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase mRNA, γand ε-germline transcripts (γ, ε-GLT), circle transcript (CT) and mature transcript (γand ε-mRNA) expression. On Day 7 and Day 14 after exposure, levels of Igs in the culture supernatant were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our findings showed that we could demonstrate cPfAg-stimulated B cells undergoing CSR by use of the expressed CSR markers and the increase in specific IgG and IgE indicating the potential of this approach in the study of CSR in P. falciparum-stimulated B cells.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=68649112653&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/28031
ISSN: 01251562
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2006-2010

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