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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/28440
Title: The tetrapeptide apgw-amide induces somatic growth in haliotis asinina linnaeus
Authors: Piyachat Chansela
Porncharn Saitongdee
Praphaporn Stewart
Nantawan Soonklang
Peter J. Hanna
Prarinyaporn Nuurai
Tanes Poomtong
Prasert Sobhon
Mahidol University
Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University
Deakin University
Coastal Aquaculture Research and Development Center
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Issue Date: 1-Nov-2010
Citation: Journal of Shellfish Research. Vol.29, No.3 (2010), 753-756
Abstract: APGW-amide is a well-known neurohormone modulator in several molluscs, and is involved in motor activities, feeding, and sexual behavior. In this report we show that injections of APGW-amide into 4-mo-old juvenile Haliotis asinina stimulate growth of body weight and, to a lesser degree, shell length. The injections were given at 0 (control), 20, and 200 ng/g body weight (BW), at 1-wk intervals for 14 wk. BW and shell length (SL) were measured every week, and growth rates were calculated. When compared with control animals, there was an approximate 2-fold increase in body growth rates of animals given 20 ng/g BW and 200 ng/g BW APGW-amide (P ≤ 0.05), whereas only 20 ng/g BW APGW-amide produced significantly greater SL than controls (P ≤ 0.05), with an approximate 1.2-fold increase. Using an immunoperoxidase technique, we showed the presence of APGW-amide in neuronal cells of the cerebral ganglia and nerve fibers. Overall, these data indicate that APGW-amide is an important neurohormone/neuromodulator in the nervous system of H. asinina and plays a role in controlling the body growth of H. asinina. .
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=78449306522&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/28440
ISSN: 07308000
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2006-2010

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