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dc.contributor.authorYoel Lubellen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnne J. Millsen_US
dc.contributor.authorChristopher J M Whittyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSarah G. Staedkeen_US
dc.contributor.otherMahidol Universityen_US
dc.contributor.otherLondon School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-24T08:37:19Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-24T08:37:19Z-
dc.date.issued2010-10-20en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE. Vol.5, No.8 (2010)en_US
dc.identifier.issn19326203en_US
dc.identifier.other2-s2.0-77957892885en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=77957892885&origin=inwarden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/28445-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Home management of malaria (HMM), promoting presumptive treatment of febrile children in the community, is advocated to improve prompt appropriate treatment of malaria in Africa. The cost-effectiveness of HMM is likely to vary widely in different settings and with the antimalarial drugs used. However, no data on the cost-effectiveness of HMM programmes are available. Methods/Principal Findings: A Markov model was constructed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HMM as compared to conventional care for febrile illnesses in children without HMM. The model was populated with data from Uganda, but is designed to be interactive, allowing the user to adjust certain parameters, including the antimalarials distributed. The model calculates the cost per disability adjusted life year averted and presents the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio compared to a threshold value. Model output is stratified by level of malaria transmission and the probability that a child would receive appropriate care from a health facility, to indicate the circumstances in which HMM is likely to be cost-effective. The model output suggests that the cost-effectiveness of HMM varies with malaria transmission, the probability of appropriate care, and the drug distributed. Where transmission is high and the probability of appropriate care is limited, HMM is likely to be cost-effective from a provider perspective. Even with the most effective antimalarials, HMM remains an attractive intervention only in areas of high malaria transmission and in medium transmission areas with a lower probability of appropriate care. HMM is generally not cost-effective in low transmission areas, regardless of which antimalarial is distributed. Considering the analysis from the societal perspective decreases the attractiveness of HMM. Conclusion: Syndromic HMM for children with fever may be a useful strategy for higher transmission settings with limited health care and diagnosis, but is not appropriate for all settings. HMM may need to be tailored to specific settings, accounting for local malaria transmission intensity and availability of health services. © 2010 Lubell et al.en_US
dc.rightsMahidol Universityen_US
dc.source.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=77957892885&origin=inwarden_US
dc.subjectAgricultural and Biological Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBiochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biologyen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.titleAn economic evaluation of home management of malaria in uganda: An interactive markov modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderSCOPUSen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0012439en_US
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2006-2010

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