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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/28488
Title: Identification and characterization of Alix/AIP1 interacting proteins from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon
Authors: P. Sangsuriya
J. Rojtinnakorn
S. Senapin
T. W. Flegel
Mahidol University
Maejo University
Thailand National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences;Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2010
Citation: Journal of Fish Diseases. Vol.33, No.7 (2010), 571-581
Abstract: Apoptosis is proposed to be a major cause of death in shrimp viral infections. From our previous study, an apoptosis-related gene, Pm-Alix, was identified from the black tiger shrimp. Its expression was high in defence-related tissues including haemocytes and the lymphoid organ. To clarify its possible role in shrimp, we used Pm-Alix as bait in a yeast two-hybrid analysis to search for Alix interacting proteins in shrimp. Two cDNA sequences discovered had homology to a predicted ubiquitin C of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and to a guanylyl cyclase of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. In vitro pull-down assays confirmed positive interaction between Pm-Alix and both proteins. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that Pm-Alix and the two binding partners were widely expressed in various tissues but more highly expressed in haemocytes. However, no significant positive or negative correlation was found in the expression of these genes as shrimp approached morbidity and death after challenge with white spot syndrome virus. Thus, the results suggested that Alix and its interacting partners did not play a direct role related to shrimp death. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=77954751109&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/28488
ISSN: 13652761
01407775
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2006-2010

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