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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/32563
Title: The epidemiology of pediatric bone and joint infections in cambodia, 2007-11
Authors: Nicole Stoesser
Joanna Pocock
Catrin E. Moore
Sona Soeng
Put Chhat Hor
Poda Sar
Direk Limmathurotsakul
Nicholas Day
Varun Kumar
Sophy Khan
Vuthy Sar
Christopher M. Parry
Angkor Hospital for Children
Mahidol University
University of Oxford
Addenbrooke's Hospital
University of Cambridge
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Feb-2013
Citation: Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. Vol.59, No.1 (2013), 36-42
Abstract: There are limited data on osteoarticular infections from resource-limited settings in Asia. A retrospective study of patients presenting to the Angkor Hospital for Children, Cambodia, January 2007-July 2011, identified 81 cases (28% monoarticular septic arthritis, 51% single-limb osteomyelitis and 15% multisite infections). The incidence was 13.8/100 000 hospital attendances. The median age was 7.3 years, with a male/female ratio of 1.9:1; 35% presented within 5 days of symptom onset (median 7 days). Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 29 (36%) cases (52% of culture-positive cases); one isolate was methicillin-resistant (MRSA). Median duration of antimicrobial treatment was 29 days (interquartile range 21-43); rates of surgical intervention were 96%, and 46% of children had sequelae, with one fatality. In this setting osteoarticular infections are relatively common with high rates of surgical intervention and sequelae. Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest culturable cause, but methicillin-resistant S. aureus is not a major problem, unlike in other Asian centers. © The Author [2012]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84873430551&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/32563
ISSN: 14653664
01426338
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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