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dc.contributor.authorKongkiat Kulkantrakornen_US
dc.contributor.authorChakraphong Lorsuwansirien_US
dc.contributor.authorPongsatorn Meesawatsomen_US
dc.contributor.otherThammasat Universityen_US
dc.contributor.otherMahidol Universityen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-19T05:36:14Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-19T05:36:14Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationPain Practice. Vol.13, No.6 (2013), 497-503en_US
dc.identifier.issn15332500en_US
dc.identifier.issn15307085en_US
dc.identifier.other2-s2.0-84880045005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84880045005&origin=inwarden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/32617-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Topical therapy may provide additional benefit in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN). This study was conducted to study the safety and efficacy of 0.025% capsaicin gel in this condition. Methods: A 20-week, double-blind, crossover, randomized, single-center study enrolled subjects with PDN. They received 0.025% capsaicin gel or placebo for 8 weeks, with a washout period of 4 weeks between the two treatments. Primary efficacy end point was percent change in visual analog scale (0-100 mm) of pain severity. Secondary outcomes were score change in Neuropathic Pain Scale (NPS), short-form McGill Pain Questionnaires (SF-MPQ), proportion of patients who had pain score reductions of 30% and 50%, and adverse event. Results: Of the 35 subjects screened, 33 were enrolled and 33 completed at least an 8-week treatment period. Intention-to-treat analysis showed no significant improvement in pain with capsaicin gel, compared with placebo with visual analog scale (VAS) score 28.8 mm vs. 34.6 mm (P = 0.53). No significant difference between the groups was found in SF-MPQ (7.4 vs. 7.71, P = 0.95), NPS (29.4 vs. 31.3, P = 0.81), and proportion of patients who had 30% or 50% pain relief. Capsaicin gel was well tolerated with minor skin reaction. Conclusions: 0.025% capsaicin gel is safe and well tolerated, but does not provide significant pain relief in patients with PDN. © 2012 The Authors Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.en_US
dc.rightsMahidol Universityen_US
dc.source.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84880045005&origin=inwarden_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.title0.025% Capsaicin Gel for the Treatment of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover, Placebo-Controlled Trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderSCOPUSen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/papr.12013en_US
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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