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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/32704
Title: Dengue and Other Common Causes of Acute Febrile Illness in Asia: An Active Surveillance Study in Children
Authors: Maria Rosario Capeding
Mary Noreen Chua
Sri Rezeki Hadinegoro
Ismail I.H.M. Hussain
Revathy Nallusamy
Punnee Pitisuttithum
Kusnandi Rusmil
Usa Thisyakorn
Stephen J. Thomas
Ngoc Huu Tran
Dewa Nyoman Wirawan
In Kyu Yoon
Alain Bouckenooghe
Yanee Hutagalung
Thelma Laot
Tram Anh Wartel
Gokila
Chong Hua Hospital
Universitas Indonesia
Kuala Lumpur Hospital
Penang Hospital
Mahidol University
Universitas Padjadjaran
Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Thailand
Pasteur Institute in Ho Chi Minh City
Universitas Udayana
Sanofi Pasteur
Sanofi Pasteur
Sanofi Pasteur
Keywords: Medicine;Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2013
Citation: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Vol.7, No.7 (2013)
Abstract: Background:Common causes of acute febrile illness in tropical countries have similar symptoms, which often mimic those of dengue. Accurate clinical diagnosis can be difficult without laboratory confirmation and disease burden is generally under-reported. Accurate, population-based, laboratory-confirmed incidence data on dengue and other causes of acute fever in dengue-endemic Asian countries are needed.Methods and principal findings:This prospective, multicenter, active fever surveillance, cohort study was conducted in selected centers in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam to determine the incidence density of acute febrile episodes (≥38°C for ≥2 days) in 1,500 healthy children aged 2-14 years, followed for a mean 237 days. Causes of fever were assessed by testing acute and convalescent sera from febrile participants for dengue, chikungunya, hepatitis A, influenza A, leptospirosis, rickettsia, and Salmonella Typhi. Overall, 289 participants had acute fever, an incidence density of 33.6 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 30.0; 37.8); 57% were IgM-positive for at least one of these diseases. The most common causes of fever by IgM ELISA were chikungunya (in 35.0% of in febrile participants) and S. Typhi (in 29.4%). The overall incidence density of dengue per 100 person-years was 3.4 by nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen positivity (95% CI: 2.4; 4.8) and 7.3 (95% CI: 5.7; 9.2) by serology. Dengue was diagnosed in 11.4% (95% CI: 8.0; 15.7) and 23.9% (95% CI: 19.1; 29.2) of febrile participants by NS1 positivity and serology, respectively. Of the febrile episodes not clinically diagnosed as dengue, 5.3% were dengue-positive by NS1 antigen testing and 16.0% were dengue-positive by serology.Conclusions:During the study period, the most common identified causes of pediatric acute febrile illness among the seven tested for were chikungunya, S. Typhi and dengue. Not all dengue cases were clinically diagnosed; laboratory confirmation is essential to refine disease burden estimates. © 2013 Capeding et al.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84880859333&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/32704
ISSN: 19352735
19352727
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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