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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/33208
Title: Ophthalmic infections in children presenting to Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia
Authors: Phara Khauv
Paul Turner
Channy Soeng
Sona Soeng
Catrin E. Moore
Rachel Bousfield
Nicole Stoesser
Kate Emary
Duy Pham Thanh
Stephen Baker
Vu Thi Ty Hang
H. Rogier Van Doorn
Nicholas P.J. Day
Christopher M. Parry
Angkor Hospital for Children
Mahidol University
Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
UCL
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Keywords: Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Issue Date: 5-Nov-2014
Citation: BMC Research Notes. Vol.7, No.1 (2014)
Abstract: © 2014 Khauv et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Ophthalmic infections cause significant morbidity in Cambodian children but aetiologic data are scarce. We investigated the causes of acute eye infections in 54 children presenting to the ophthalmology clinic at Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap between March and October 2012. Findings: The median age at presentation was 3.6 years (range 6 days - 16.0 years). Forty two patients (77.8%) were classified as having an external eye infection, ten (18.5%) as ophthalmia neonatorum, and two (3.7%) as intra-ocular infection. Organisms were identified in all ophthalmia neonatorum patients and 85.7% of patients with an external eye infection. Pathogens were not detected in either of the intra-ocular infection patients. Most commonly isolated bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus (23 isolates), coagulase-negative staphylococci (13), coliforms (7), Haemophilus influenzae/parainfluenzae (6), Streptococcus pneumoniae (4), and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (2). Chlamydia trachomatis DNA was detected in 60% of swabs taken from ophthalmia neonatorum cases. Conclusions: This small study demonstrates the wide range of pathogens associated with common eye infections in Cambodian children. The inclusion of molecular assays improved the spectrum of detectable pathogens, most notably in neonates.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84920842313&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/33208
ISSN: 17560500
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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