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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/35164
Title: Intestinal parasite infections in symptomatic children attending hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia
Authors: Catrin E. Moore
Phot Nget
Mao Saroeun
Suy Kuong
Seng Chanthou
Varun Kumar
Rachel Bousfield
Johanna Nader
J. Wendi Bailey
Nicholas J. Beeching
Nicholas P. Day
Christopher M. Parry
Mahidol University
University of Oxford
Angkor Hospital for Children
Addenbrooke's Hospital
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences;Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Issue Date: 7-May-2015
Citation: PLoS ONE. Vol.10, No.5 (2015)
Abstract: © 2015 Moore et al. Background: Infections with helminths and other intestinal parasites are an important but neglected problem in children in developing countries. Accurate surveys of intestinal parasites in children inform empirical treatment regimens and can assess the impact of school based drug treatment programmes. There is limited information on this topic in Cambodia. Methods: In a prospective study of intestinal parasites in symptomatic children attending Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, April-June 2012, samples were examined by microscopy of a direct and concentrated fecal sample. Two culture methods for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were employed when sufficient sample was received. Demographic, clinical and epidemiological data were collected. Principal Findings: We studied 970 samples from 865 children. The median (inter-quartile range) age of the children was 5.4 (1.9-9.2) years, 54% were male. The proportion of children with abdominal pain was 66.8%, diarrhea 34.9%, anemia 12.7% and malnutrition 7.4%. 458 parasitic infections were detected in 340 (39.3%) children. The most common parasites using all methods of detection were hookworm (14.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (11.6%) and Giardia lamblia (11.2%). Giardia lamblia was most common in children aged 1-5 years, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were more common with increasing age. Hookworm, Strongloides stercoralis and Giardia lamblia were more common in children living outside of Siem Reap town. In a multivariate logistic regression increasing age was associated with all three infections, defecating in the forest for hookworm infection, the presence of cattle for S. stercoralis and not using soap for handwashing for G. lamblia. Conclusions/Significance: This study confirms the importance of intestinal parasitic infections in symptomatic Cambodian children and the need for adequate facilities for laboratory diagnosis together with education to improve personal hygiene and sanitation.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84929094096&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/35164
ISSN: 19326203
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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