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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/35199
Title: Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from areas of repeated emergence of drug resistant malaria show no evidence of hypermutator phenotype
Authors: Tyler S. Brown
Christopher G. Jacob
Joana C. Silva
Shannon Takala-Harrison
Abdoulaye Djimdé
Arjen M. Dondorp
Mark Fukuda
Harald Noedl
Myaing Myaing Nyunt
Myat Phone Kyaw
Mayfong Mayxay
Tran Tinh Hien
Christopher V. Plowe
Michael P. Cummings
University of Bamako Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odonto-Stomatology
Mahidol University
Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Medizinische Universitat Wien
Mahosot Hospital
University of Health Sciences
Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Thailand
University of Maryland
Department of Medical Research (Lower Myanmar)
University of Oxford
The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences;Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology;Immunology and Microbiology;Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Mar-2015
Citation: Infection, Genetics and Evolution. Vol.30, (2015), 318-322
Abstract: © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Multiple transcontinental waves of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum have originated in Southeast Asia before spreading westward, first into the rest of Asia and then to sub-Saharan Africa. In vitro studies have suggested that hypermutator P. falciparum parasites may exist in Southeast Asia and that an increased rate of acquisition of new mutations in these parasites may explain the repeated emergence of drug resistance in Southeast Asia. This study is the first to test the hypermutator hypothesis using field isolates. Using genome-wide SNP data from human P. falciparum infections in Southeast Asia and West Africa and a test for relative rate differences we found no evidence of increased relative substitution rates in P. falciparum isolates from Southeast Asia. Instead, we found significantly increased substitution rates in Mali and Bangladesh populations relative to those in populations from Southeast Asia. Additionally we found no association between increased relative substitution rates and parasite clearance following treatment with artemisinin derivatives.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84921528358&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/35199
ISSN: 15677257
15671348
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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