Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/35445
Title: Genome-wide analysis of ChREBP binding sites on male mouse liver and white adipose chromatin
Authors: Naravat Poungvarin
Benny Chang
Minako Imamura
Junsheng Chen
Kanya Moolsuwan
Chanachai Sae-Lee
Wei Li
Lawrence Chan
Baylor College of Medicine
Mahidol University
Riken
Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center
Keywords: Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Issue Date: 1-Jun-2015
Citation: Endocrinology. Vol.156, No.6 (2015), 1982-1994
Abstract: Copyright © 2015 by the Endocrine Society. Glucose is an essential nutrient that directly regulates the expression of numerous genes in liver and adipose tissue. The carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) links glucose as a signaling molecule to multiple glucose-dependent transcriptional regulatory pathways, particularly genes involved in glycolytic and lipogenic processes. In this study, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing to identify specific ChREBP binding targets in liver and white adipose tissue. We found a large number of ChREBP binding sites, which are attributable to 5825 genes in the liver, 2418 genes in white adipose tissue, and 5919 genes in both tissues. The majority of these target genes were involved in known metabolic processes. Pathways in insulin signaling, the adherens junction, and cancers were among the top 5 pathways in both tissues. Motif analysis revealed a consensus sequence CAYGYGnnnnnCRCRTG that was commonly shared by ChREBP binding sites. Putative ChREBP binding sequences were enriched on promoters of genes involved in insulin signaling pathway, insulin resistance, and tumorigenesis.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84930449863&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/35445
ISSN: 19457170
00137227
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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