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dc.contributor.authorBenedikt Leyen_US
dc.contributor.authorNick Luteren_US
dc.contributor.authorFe Esperanza Espinoen_US
dc.contributor.authorAngela Devineen_US
dc.contributor.authorMichael Kalnokyen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoel Lubellen_US
dc.contributor.authorKamala Thriemeren_US
dc.contributor.authorJ. Kevin Bairden_US
dc.contributor.authorEugenie Poiroten_US
dc.contributor.authorNolwenn Conanen_US
dc.contributor.authorChong Chee Kheongen_US
dc.contributor.authorLek Dysoleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWasif Ali Khanen_US
dc.contributor.authorApril G. Dion-Berbosoen_US
dc.contributor.authorGermana Banconeen_US
dc.contributor.authorJimee Hwangen_US
dc.contributor.authorRitu Kumaren_US
dc.contributor.authorRic N. Priceen_US
dc.contributor.authorLorenz Von Seidleinen_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzalo J. Domingoen_US
dc.contributor.otherMenzies School of Health Researchen_US
dc.contributor.otherPATH Seattleen_US
dc.contributor.otherResearch Institute of Tropical Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.otherMahidol Universityen_US
dc.contributor.otherEijkman-Oxford Clinical Research Uniten_US
dc.contributor.otherNuffield Department of Clinical Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of California, San Franciscoen_US
dc.contributor.otherMalaria Consortiumen_US
dc.contributor.otherKementerian Kesihatan Malaysiaen_US
dc.contributor.otherNational Center for Parasitology, Entomology and Malaria Controlen_US
dc.contributor.otherNational Institute of Public Healthen_US
dc.contributor.otherInternational Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research Bangladeshen_US
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of the Philippines Manilaen_US
dc.contributor.otherShoklo Malaria Research Uniten_US
dc.contributor.otherCenters for Disease Control and Preventionen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-23T10:15:34Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-23T10:15:34Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09-29en_US
dc.identifier.citationMalaria Journal. Vol.14, No.1 (2015)en_US
dc.identifier.issn14752875en_US
dc.identifier.other2-s2.0-84942421382en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84942421382&origin=inwarden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/36072-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Ley et al. The only currently available drug that effectively removes malaria hypnozoites from the human host is primaquine. The use of 8-aminoquinolines is hampered by haemolytic side effects in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient individuals. Recently a number of qualitative and a quantitative rapid diagnostic test (RDT) format have been developed that provide an alternative to the current standard G6PD activity assays. The WHO has recently recommended routine testing of G6PD status prior to primaquine radical cure whenever possible. A workshop was held in the Philippines in early 2015 to discuss key challenges and knowledge gaps that hinder the introduction of routine G6PD testing. Two point-of-care (PoC) test formats for the measurement of G6PD activity are currently available: qualitative tests comparable to malaria RDT as well as biosensors that provide a quantitative reading. Qualitative G6PD PoC tests provide a binomial test result, are easy to use and some products are comparable in price to the widely used fluorescent spot test. Qualitative test results can accurately classify hemizygous males, heterozygous females, but may misclassify females with intermediate G6PD activity. Biosensors provide a more complex quantitative readout and are better suited to identify heterozygous females. While associated with higher costs per sample tested biosensors have the potential for broader use in other scenarios where knowledge of G6PD activity is relevant as well. The introduction of routine G6PD testing is associated with additional costs on top of routine treatment that will vary by setting and will need to be assessed prior to test introduction. Reliable G6PD PoC tests have the potential to play an essential role in future malaria elimination programmes, however require an improved understanding on how to best integrate routine G6PD testing into different health settings.en_US
dc.rightsMahidol Universityen_US
dc.source.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84942421382&origin=inwarden_US
dc.subjectImmunology and Microbiologyen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.titleThe challenges of introducing routine G6PD testing into radical cure: A workshop reporten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderSCOPUSen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12936-015-0896-8en_US
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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