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dc.contributor.authorRhea J. Longleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorAdrian V.S. Hillen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlexandra J. Spenceren_US
dc.contributor.otherNuffield Department of Clinical Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.otherWalter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Researchen_US
dc.contributor.otherMahidol Universityen_US
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Melbourneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-23T10:21:14Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-23T10:21:14Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Microbiology. Vol.6, No.SEP (2015)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664302Xen_US
dc.identifier.other2-s2.0-84946712685en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84946712685&origin=inwarden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/36165-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Longley, Hill and Spencer. The development of a highly efficacious and durable vaccine for malaria remains a top priority for global health researchers. Despite the huge rise in recognition of malaria as a global health problem and the concurrent rise in funding over the past 10-15 years, malaria continues to remain a widespread burden. The evidence of increasing resistance to anti-malarial drugs and insecticides is a growing concern. Hence, an efficacious and durable preventative vaccine for malaria is urgently needed. Vaccines are one of the most cost-effective tools and have successfully been used in the prevention and control of many diseases, however, the development of a vaccine for the Plasmodium parasite has proved difficult. Given the early success of whole sporozoite mosquito-bite delivered vaccination strategies, we know that a vaccine for malaria is an achievable goal, with sub-unit vaccines holding great promise as they are simple and cheap to both manufacture and deploy. However a major difficulty in development of sub-unit vaccines lies within choosing the appropriate antigenic target from the 5000 or so genes expressed by the parasite. Given the liver-stage of malaria represents a bottle-neck in the parasite's life cycle, there is widespread agreement that a multi-component sub-unit malaria vaccine should preferably contain a liver-stage target. In this article we review progress in identifying and screening Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targets for use in a malaria vaccine.en_US
dc.rightsMahidol Universityen_US
dc.source.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84946712685&origin=inwarden_US
dc.subjectImmunology and Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleMalaria vaccines: Identifying Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targetsen_US
dc.typeReviewen_US
dc.rights.holderSCOPUSen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2015.00965en_US
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2011-2015

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