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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/40716
Title: High efficacy of primaquine treatment for plasmodium vivax in western Thailand
Authors: Rhea J. Longley
Piyarat Sripoorote
Pornpimol Chobson
Teerawat Saeseu
Chonlaphat Sukasem
Suparat Phuanukoonnon
Wang Nguitragool
Ivo Mueller
Jetsumon Sattabongkot
Mahidol University
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research
University of Melbourne
Instituto de Salud Global de Barcelona
Keywords: Immunology and Microbiology;Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Nov-2016
Citation: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Vol.95, No.5 (2016), 1086-1089
Abstract: © 2016 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Primaquine is the only licensed antimalarial drug that is capable of clearing dormant Plasmodium vivax liver stage parasites. To date, there is no clear evidence of resistance of the liver stage parasite against this drug, because of the difficulty in ascertaining the cause of recurrent infection. We followed 52 Thai P. vivax patients for 9 months after directly observed treatment of 15 mg primaquine daily for 14 days. Blood samples taken at 2-4 weekly intervals were assessed by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of parasites. Only four of 52 (7.7%) volunteers had recurrent P. vivax infections, all at least 8 weeks after treatment. This demonstrates that primaquine retains a high efficacy in this population. Although a risk of new infections could not be ruled out, parasite genotyping at two polymorphic markers suggested a high probability of late relapsing infections in these volunteers. Continued monitoring of primaquine efficacy in this region is advisable.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84994298836&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/40716
ISSN: 00029637
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2016-2017

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