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dc.contributor.authorSikarin Upalaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnawin Sanguankeoen_US
dc.contributor.otherColumbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeonsen_US
dc.contributor.otherMahidol Universityen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-11T03:00:41Z
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-14T08:01:42Z-
dc.date.available2018-12-11T03:00:41Z
dc.date.available2019-03-14T08:01:42Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationPhotodermatology Photoimmunology and Photomedicine. Vol.32, No.4 (2016), 181-190en_US
dc.identifier.issn16000781en_US
dc.identifier.issn09054383en_US
dc.identifier.other2-s2.0-84963823283en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84963823283&origin=inwarden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/40786-
dc.description.abstract© 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a number of autoimmune diseases. We completed a meta-analysis of observational studies to establish whether there was a relationship between hypovitaminosis D and the autoimmune skin disease vitiligo. Methods: Comprehensive search was applied in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from their inception to December 2015. Inclusion criteria were observational studies that assessed 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in adults with vitiligo. The main outcome was the mean difference in serum 25(OH)D level between patients with vitiligo and controls. Results: Our search strategy identified 383 articles; seventeen studies met the criteria for full-length review and seven studies, containing the data of 1200 patients, were included in a random-effects model meta-analysis. The pooled mean difference in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration between patients with vitiligo and controls was −7.45 ng/ml (95% confidence interval, −12.99 to −1.91, P-value = 0.01). The between-study heterogeneity (I2) was 96%, P = value<0.001. Conclusions: This meta-analysis identifies a significant relationship between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and vitiligo, but does not prove causation. Our findings emphasize the importance of measuring 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in patients with vitiligo. Further studies will be needed to establish whether vitamin D supplementation in this population improves the outcome of vitiligo.en_US
dc.rightsMahidol Universityen_US
dc.source.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84963823283&origin=inwarden_US
dc.subjectImmunology and Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleLow 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are associated with vitiligo: a systematic review and meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderSCOPUSen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/phpp.12241en_US
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2016-2017

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