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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/40997
Title: A retrospective analysis of melioidosis in Cambodian children, 2009-2013
Authors: Paul Turner
Sabine Kloprogge
Thyl Miliya
Sona Soeng
Pisey Tan
Poda Sar
Pagnarith Yos
Catrin E. Moore
Vanaporn Wuthiekanun
Direk Limmathurotsakul
Claudia Turner
Nicholas P.J. Day
David A.B. Dance
Angkor Hospital for Children
Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
Mahidol University
Lao-Oxford-Mahosot Hospital-Wellcome Trust Research Unit (LOMWRU)
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 21-Nov-2016
Citation: BMC Infectious Diseases. Vol.16, No.1 (2016)
Abstract: © 2016 The Author(s). Background: Melioidiosis, infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important but frequently under-recognised cause of morbidity and mortality in Southeast Asia and elsewhere in the tropics. Data on the epidemiology of paediatric melioidosis in Cambodia are extremely limited. Methods: Culture-positive melioidosis cases presenting to Angkor Hospital for Children, a non-governmental paediatric hospital located in Siem Reap, Northern Cambodia, between 1st January 2009 and 31st December 2013 were identified by searches of hospital and laboratory databases and logbooks. Results: One hundred seventy-three evaluable cases were identified, presenting from eight provinces. For Siem Reap province, the median commune level incidence was estimated to be 28-35 cases per 100,000 children <15 years per year. Most cases presented during the wet season, May to October. The median age at presentation was 5.7 years (range 8 days-15.9 years). Apart from undernutrition, co-morbidities were rare. Three quarters (131/173) of the children had localised infection, most commonly skin/soft tissue infection (60 cases) or suppurative parotitis (51 cases). There were 39 children with B. pseudomallei bacteraemia: 29 (74.4%) of these had clinical and/or radiological evidence of pneumonia. Overall mortality was 16.8% (29/173) with mortality in bacteraemic cases of 71.8% (28/39). At least seven children did not receive an antimicrobial with activity against B. pseudomallei prior to death. Conclusions: This retrospective study demonstrated a considerable burden of melioidosis in Cambodian children. Given the high mortality associated with bacteraemic infection, there is an urgent need for greater awareness amongst healthcare professionals in Cambodia and other countries where melioidosis is known or suspected to be endemic. Empiric treatment guidelines should ensure suspected cases are treated early with appropriate antimicrobials.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84997769526&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/40997
ISSN: 14712334
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2016-2017

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