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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/41594
Title: Using flow field-flow fractionation (Fl-FFF) for observation of salinity effect on the size distribution of humic acid aggregates
Authors: Rabiab Suwanpetch
Juwadee Shiowatana
Atitaya Siripinyanond
Mahidol University
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences;Chemistry;Environmental Science
Issue Date: 19-Feb-2017
Citation: International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry. Vol.97, No.3 (2017), 217-229
Abstract: © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Flow field-flow fractionation (Fl-FFF) was used to investigate the effect of salinity on the size distribution of humic acid (HA) aggregates in estuarine water. In water with high salinity as estuarine water, size distributions were slightly broadened with increasing contact time between HA and estuarine water. At the longest contact times (89 days) and highest salinity value (28 psu, g kg−1), the peak maxima were observed at 1.7 and 8.6 nm when detected at 254 nm, and at 1.9 and 9.1 nm when detected at 400 nm. In addition, Fl-FFF with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was applied to examine the effect of salinity on the size distribution of Cd, Ce, Cu, Mn and Pb-binding HA aggregates in estuarine water with different salinity values. At 1 day contact time, the peak maxima of Cd, Ce, Cu, Mn and Pb-binding HA aggregates in water with increased salinity values were increased and gave the larger breadth of size distribution. The larger size fraction of HA aggregates showed more affinity for Pb, Cd, Ce and Mn than Cu whereas the smaller size fraction of humic aggregates showed preferential binding towards Cu.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85014522250&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/41594
ISSN: 10290397
03067319
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2016-2017

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