Simple jQuery Dropdowns
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/42969
Title: Epidemiology and burden of multidrug-resistant bacterial infection in a developing country
Authors: Cherry Lim
Emi Takahashi
Maliwan Hongsuwan
Vanaporn Wuthiekanun
Visanu Thamlikitkul
Soawapak Hinjoy
Nicholas P.J. Day
Sharon J. Peacock
Direk Limmathurotsakul
Mahidol University
Thailand Ministry of Public Health
Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
University of Cambridge
Keywords: Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology;Immunology and Microbiology
Issue Date: 6-Sep-2016
Citation: eLife. Vol.5, No.September (2016)
Abstract: © Lim et al. Little is known about the excess mortality caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infection in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We retrospectively obtained microbiology laboratory and hospital databases of nine public hospitals in northeast Thailand from 2004 to 2010, and linked these with the national death registry to obtain the 30-day mortality outcome. The 30-day mortality in those with MDR community-acquired bacteraemia, healthcareassociated bacteraemia, and hospital-acquired bacteraemia were 35% (549/1555), 49% (247/500), and 53% (640/1198), respectively. We estimate that 19,122 of 45,209 (43%) deaths in patients with hospital-acquired infection due to MDR bacteria in Thailand in 2010 represented excess mortality caused by MDR. We demonstrate that national statistics on the epidemiology and burden of MDR in LMICs could be improved by integrating information from readily available databases. The prevalence and mortality attributable to MDR in Thailand are high. This is likely to reflect the situation in other LMICs.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84988527741&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/42969
ISSN: 2050084X
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2016-2017

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.