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dc.contributor.authorBipin Adhikarien_US
dc.contributor.authorKoukeo Phommasoneen_US
dc.contributor.authorTiengkham Pongvongsaen_US
dc.contributor.authorXayaphone Soundalaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalingnaphone Koummarasyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGisela Henriquesen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas J. Petoen_US
dc.contributor.authorLorenz Von Seidleinen_US
dc.contributor.authorNicholas J. Whiteen_US
dc.contributor.authorNicholas P.J. Dayen_US
dc.contributor.authorArjen M. Dondorpen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaul N. Newtonen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhaik Yeong Cheahen_US
dc.contributor.authorMayfong Mayxayen_US
dc.contributor.authorChristopher Pellen_US
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Oxforden_US
dc.contributor.otherChurchill Hospitalen_US
dc.contributor.otherImperial College Londonen_US
dc.contributor.otherMahidol Universityen_US
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Amsterdamen_US
dc.contributor.otherAmsterdam Institute for Global Health and Developmenten_US
dc.contributor.otherMahosot Hospitalen_US
dc.contributor.otherSavannakhet Provincial Health Departmenten_US
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Health Sciencesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-23T10:13:19Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-23T10:13:19Z-
dc.date.issued2018-12-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE. Vol.13, No.12 (2018)en_US
dc.identifier.issn19326203en_US
dc.identifier.other2-s2.0-85058387319en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85058387319&origin=inwarden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/44643-
dc.description.abstract© 2018 Adhikari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background In the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS), malaria elimination efforts are targeting the asymptomatic parasite reservoirs. Understanding community perceptions about asymptomatic malaria infections and interventions that target this reservoir is critical to the design of community engagement. This article examines knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices related to asymptomatic malaria infections and mass drug administration (MDA) in malaria-endemic villages in southern Savannakhet Province, Laos. Methods A questionnaire consisting of questions on socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices on malaria and MDA was administered to each household head or representative (n = 281) in four villages. These topics were also further discussed in 12 single-gender focus group discussions (FGDs). The FGDs were conducted in all four villages and consisted of eight to 10 participants. Results A minority (14.2%; 40/281) of respondents agreed that a seemingly healthy person could have malaria parasite in his or her blood. Half (52%; 146/281) disagreed and one third (33.8%, 95/281) were unsure. Respondents who responded that “MDA aims to cure everyone” [AOR = 4.6; CI: 1.6–13.1], “MDA is to make our community malaria free” [AOR = 3.3; CI: 1.3–8.1] and “I will take part in future MDA” [AOR = 9.9; CI: 1.2–78.8] were more likely to accept the idea of asymptomatic malaria. During FGDs, respondents recalled signs and symptoms of malaria (fever, chills and headache), and described malaria as a major health problem. Symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria infections were associated with their work in the forest and living conditions. Measures described to eliminate malaria included using mosquito nets, wearing long-sleeved clothes and taking medicine when symptomatic. Most respondents were unaware of MDA as a tool to eliminate malaria. Conclusions Awareness of asymptomatic malaria infections, and MDA as a tool to eliminate malaria, was low. With the need to target asymptomatic malaria carriers for elimination efforts in the GMS, as well as informing target groups about asymptomatic infection, accompanying community engagement must build trust in interventions through the active collaboration of government stakeholders, key local persons and community members. This entails training and devolving responsibilities to the community members to implement and sustain the control and elimination efforts.en_US
dc.rightsMahidol Universityen_US
dc.source.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85058387319&origin=inwarden_US
dc.subjectAgricultural and Biological Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBiochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biologyen_US
dc.titlePerceptions of asymptomatic malaria infection and their implications for malaria control and elimination in Laosen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderSCOPUSen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0208912en_US
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2018

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