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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/44914
Title: Early neonatal mortality and neurological outcomes of neonatal resuscitation in a resource-limited setting on the Thailand-Myanmar border: A descriptive study
Authors: Sophie Janet
Verena I. Carrara
Julie A. Simpson
Nant War War Thin
Wah Wah Say
Naw Ta Mlar Paw
Kesinee Chotivanich
Claudia Turner
Jane Crawley
Rose McGready
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
Mahidol University
Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
Angkor Hospital for Children
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences;Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2018
Citation: PLoS ONE. Vol.13, No.1 (2018)
Abstract: © 2018 Janet et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background Of the 4 million neonatal deaths worldwide yearly, 98% occur in low and middle-income countries. Effective resuscitation reduces mortality and morbidity but long-term outcomes in resource-limited settings are poorly described. This study reports on newborn neurological outcomes following resuscitation at birth in a resource-limited setting where intensive newborn care including intubation is unavailable. Methods Retrospective analysis of births records from 2008 to 2015 at Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Findings From 21,225 newbonrs delivered, 15,073 (71%) met the inclusion criteria (liveborn, singleton, 28 weeks’ gestation, delivered in SMRU). Neonatal resuscitation was performed in 460 (3%; 422 basic, 38 advanced) cases. Overall early neonatal mortality was 6.6 deaths per 1000 live births (95% CI 5.40–8.06). Newborns receiving basic and advanced resuscitation presented an adjusted rate for death of 1.30 (95%CI 0.66–2.55; p = 0.442), and 6.32 (95%CI 3.01–13.26; p<0.001) respectively, compared to newborns given routine care. Main factors related to increased need for resuscitation were breech delivery, meconium, and fetal distress (p<0.001). Neurodevelopmental follow-up to one year was performed in 1,608 (10.5%) of the 15,073 newborns; median neurodevelopmental scores of non-resuscitated newborns and those receiving basic resuscitation were similar (64 (n = 1565) versus 63 (n = 41); p = 0.732), while advanced resuscitation scores were significantly lower (56 (n = 5); p = 0.017). Interpretations Newborns requiring basic resuscitation at birth have normal neuro-developmental outcomes at one year of age compared to low-risk newborns. Identification of risk factors (e.g., breech delivery) associated with increased need for neonatal resuscitation may facilitate allocation of staff to high-risk deliveries. This work endorses the use of basic resuscitation in low-resource settings, and supports on-going staff training to maintain bag-and-mask ventilation skills.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85040130426&origin=inward
http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/44914
ISSN: 19326203
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2018

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