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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/51850
Title: Brief Report: Malignancies in Adults Living with HIV in Asia
Authors: Awachana Jiamsakul
Mark Polizzotto
Stephane Wen-Wei Ku
Junko Tanuma
Eugenie Hui
Romanee Chaiwarith
Sasisopin Kiertiburanakul
Anchalee Avihingasanon
Evy Yunihastuti
Nagalingeswaran Kumarasamy
Penh Sun Ly
Sanjay Pujari
Rossana Ditangco
Cuong Duy Do
Tuti Parwati Merati
Pacharee Kantipong
Fujie Zhang
Kinh Van Nguyen
Adeeba Kamarulzaman
Jun Yong Choi
Benedict L.H. Sim
Oon Tek Ng
Jeremy Ross
Wingwai Wong
Hospital Sungai Buloh
Beijing Ditan Hospital Capital Medical University
VHS Medical Centre India
Gokila
Bach Mai Hospital
Universitas Udayana
University of Indonesia, RSUPN Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo
Chulalongkorn University
Kirby Institute
National Center for Global Health and Medicine
Yonsei University College of Medicine
Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
Queen Elizabeth Hospital Hong Kong
University of Malaya Medical Centre
Veterans General Hospital-Taipei
Tan Tock Seng Hospital
Chiang Mai University
National Hospital for Tropical Diseases
Foundation for AIDS Research
Institute of Infectious Diseases
Chiangrai Prachanukroh Hospital
University of Health Sciences
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Mar-2019
Citation: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. Vol.80, No.3 (2019), 301-307
Abstract: © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Background:Hematological malignancies have continued to be highly prevalent among people living with HIV (PLHIV). This study assessed the occurrence of, risk factors for, and outcomes of hematological and nonhematological malignancies in PLHIV in Asia.Methods:Incidence of malignancy after cohort enrollment was evaluated. Factors associated with development of hematological and nonhematological malignancy were analyzed using competing risk regression and survival time using Kaplan-Meier.Results:Of 7455 patients, 107 patients (1%) developed a malignancy: 34 (0.5%) hematological [0.08 per 100 person-years (/100PY)] and 73 (1%) nonhematological (0.17/100PY). Of the hematological malignancies, non-Hodgkin lymphoma was predominant (n = 26, 76%): immunoblastic (n = 6, 18%), Burkitt (n = 5, 15%), diffuse large B-cell (n = 5, 15%), and unspecified (n = 10, 30%). Others include central nervous system lymphoma (n = 7, 21%) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 1, 3%). Nonhematological malignancies were mostly Kaposi sarcoma (n = 12, 16%) and cervical cancer (n = 10, 14%). Risk factors for hematological malignancy included age >50 vs. ≤30 years [subhazard ratio (SHR) = 6.48, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.79 to 23.43] and being from a high-income vs. a lower-middle-income country (SHR = 3.97, 95% CI: 1.45 to 10.84). Risk was reduced with CD4 351-500 cells/μL (SHR = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.05 to 0.74) and CD4 >500 cells/μL (SHR = 0.14, 95% CI: 0.04 to 0.78), compared to CD4 ≤200 cells/μL. Similar risk factors were seen for nonhematological malignancy, with prior AIDS diagnosis showing a weak association. Patients diagnosed with a hematological malignancy had shorter survival time compared to patients diagnosed with a nonhematological malignancy.Conclusions:Nonhematological malignancies were common but non-Hodgkin lymphoma was more predominant in our cohort. PLHIV from high-income countries were more likely to be diagnosed, indicating a potential underdiagnosis of cancer in low-income settings.
URI: http://repository.li.mahidol.ac.th/dspace/handle/123456789/51850
metadata.dc.identifier.url: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85061481888&origin=inward
ISSN: 10779450
15254135
Appears in Collections:Scopus 2019

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